Always pray and never give up

images-97An amazing parable from the Master Teacher! It’s about persevering in prayer.

It’s one of the few parables where Jesus gave the purpose at the beginning.

“Then Jesus told his disciples a parable to show them that they should always pray and not give up. He said: ‘In a certain town there was a judge who neither feared God nor cared what people thought. And there was a widow in that town who kept coming to him with the plea, ‘Grant me justice against my adversary.’”

“For some time he refused. But finally he said to himself, ‘Even though I don’t fear God or care what people think, yet because this widow keeps bothering me, I will see that she gets justice, so that she won’t eventually come and attack me!’”

“And the Lord said, ‘Listen to what the unjust judge says. And will not God bring about justice for his chosen ones, who cry out to him day and night? Will he keep putting them off? I tell you, he will see that they get justice, and quickly. However, when the Son of Man comes, will he find faith on the earth?’” (Luke 18:1-8).

 Jesus used two main characters from opposite ends of the continuum of power and privilege: a corrupt Judge and a persistent widow.

Unexpected behavior

The picture Jesus gave of the persistent widow breaks significantly with the script expected of her in an unjust world. The courts were a man’s world. But this widow did not have a man to represent her so she persisted up against seemingly insurmountable odds.

Remember that this parable is presented to teach us that we “should always pray and not give up” (Luke 18:1).

Evidently the long view of the parable reaches to the time when Jesus returns. Jesus said, “And will not God bring about justice for his chosen ones, who cry out to him day and night? Will he keep putting them off? I tell you, he will see that they get justice, and quickly. However, when the Son of Man comes, will he find faith on the earth?” (Luke 18:7-8). Yet this does not discount the immediate applications we should all make about God and prayer.

Look closely at the Lord’s purpose for this parable.

“Then Jesus told his disciples a parable to show them that they should always pray and not give up” (Luke 18:1).

Although the parable itself contrasts a corrupt Judge and a persistent widow, the opening purpose statement implies two kinds of people:

  1. Those who always pray
  2. Those who give up

Jesus obviously advocates persistence in prayer.

When it feels like the odds are stacked against you, keep on praying! I know what it’s like to persevere in prayer, but I’ve also been guilty of giving up. To give up is to become wearied or dis-spirited. Sometimes we give up praying because we become impatient for answers. Other times we allow doubt to discourage us.

In his application of the parable, Jesus connected giving up on prayer with lack of faith, “… when the Son of Man comes, will he find faith on the earth?” (Luke 18:8). This is important to recognize because Scripture teaches that the trials of this life are used by God to produce perseverance in us, “Consider it pure joy, my brothers and sisters, whenever you face trials of many kinds, because you know that the testing of your faith produces perseverance. Let perseverance finish its work so that you may be mature and complete, not lacking anything” (James 1:2-5).

As we persevere in praying, we learn a lot about ourselves and God.

Prayer offers an opportunity to grow in maturity. In his book, “Prayer: Does It Make Any Difference?”Philip Yancey confessed,  “Prayer has become for me much more than a shopping list of requests to present to God. It has become a realignment of everything. I pray to restore the truth of the universe, to gain a glimpse of the world, and of me, through the eyes of God.” “In prayer, I shift my point of view away from my own selfishness. …. Prayer is the act of seeing reality from God’s point of view.”

Scripture repeatedly encourages us to persevere. “Let us not become weary in doing good, for at the proper time we will reap a harvest if we do not give up” (Galatians 6:9; cf. II Corinthians 4:16; II Thessalonians 3:13; Hebrews 3:12-13). “So do not throw away your confidence; it will be richly rewarded. You need to persevere so that when you have done the will of God, you will receive what he has promised” (Hebrews 10:35-36). “Let us throw off everything that hinders and the sin that so easily entangles. And let us run with perseverance the race marked out for us…” (Hebrews 12:2-3).

Two examples of perseverance in prayer with different outcomes.

“During the days of Jesus’ life on earth, he offered up prayers and petitions with fervent cries and tears to the one who could save him from death, and he was heard because of his reverent submission” (Hebrews 5:7).

“When they hurled their insults at him, he did not retaliate; when he suffered, he made no threats. Instead, he entrusted himself to him who judges justly” (I Peter 2:23).

The content of the parable

  • Luke 18:2 – The character of the Judge
  • Luke 18:3 – The distress of the widow
  • Luke 18:4-5 – The determination of the widow and the decision of the Judge

“The judge ignored her for a while, but finally he said to himself, ‘I don’t fear God or care about people, but this woman is driving me crazy. I’m going to see that she gets justice, because she is wearing me out with her constant requests!’” (NLT)

Moving from lesser to greater or making a “How much more…” argument

The primary point of the parable itself is to motivate us to perseverance in prayer based on the goodness of God in contrast with the worthless character of an earthly Judge.

 “And the Lord said, “Listen to what the unjust judge says. And will not God bring about justice for his chosen ones, who cry out to him day and night? Will he keep putting them off? I tell you, he will see that they get justice, and quickly. However, when the Son of Man comes, will he find faith on the earth?” (Luke 18:6-8).

Questions

  • Q. What kind of prayer is presented in this parable?
  • A. Prayer for intervention to bring about justice. It is a petitionary prayer. I am facing some great need and I feel that injustice should be addressed. Perhaps like the widow, it is beyond my power to do anything about it. Prayer is an appeal to one who can do what I cannot do.
  • Q. What does the appeal to not give up imply about prayer?
  • Q. Why does God allow perseverance in prayer to be part of our experience with Him?
  • Q. Why would someone give up praying?

See: Four Reasons for persistent prayer

Steve Cornell

This entry was posted in Jesus Christ, Parables, Prayer, Spiritual disciplines, Spiritual inventory, Spiritual transformation, Teaching, Teaching of Jesus, Uncategorized and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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