Answering God’s call beyond the walls of the Church

 

“We make a huge mistake when we define a person’s ‘call’ in terms of participation inside the church.” (Tullian Tchividjian)

While on a writing retreat in Brewster, Cape Cod one summer, I had a great time meeting different people. But I have this little problem in getting to know people when the dreaded question comes up. “So, what do you do?” they inevitably ask. If I want to continue the conversation, I have to be careful with my answer.

If I say, “I am a pastor” it immediately changes the conversation – or, more likely, ends it. It’s a real dilemma. One night, for example, a group of people doing a restaurant limousine tour saw me in the lobby of the resort working on my book. They asked what I was doing. “Writing a book,” I answered. “Really, what’s it about?” they asked. “It’s about how your upbringing affects your life.”

Immediately the three couples gathered around me to engaged in lively discussion about the subject.

In the middle of some rather deep conversation, one man blurted, “Who is this guy?!” “How do you know this stuff?” “Are you a psychiatrist, or something?” “No” I answered, “but I do a lot of counseling.” “You’re a counselor?” “Yes, I am.” He quickly tried to sign up his wife for a few sessions.

What I said about what I do was true even if I am not solely a counselor by occupation. I was doing what I could to avoid the conversation stopper: “I am a minister.”

Ten minutes after the group left for the dining room, a waiter told me one of the men who was talking with me would like to buy me a drink. Later in the evening, his wife came to tell me how exceptional it was for her husband to order a drink for someone. “You made a big impression on him” she assured me.

All of this to say that had I announced I was a pastor, the evening would have proceeded much differently. People recoil and become guarded when they learn that you’re a minister. After all, “What do you say to a pastor?!” It’s a real occupational liability for someone who works with people!

I thought about this encounter when I read a blog piece by Tullian Tchividjian.

Under the title, Our calling, Our Spheres, he shared thoughts about how leaders in the Church “need to help our people see that their calling is bigger than how much time they put into church matters.”

Of course, serving in your Church is important but it could be wrongly exalted over serving God in your career. Here are some good thoughts on glorifying God in all you do:

“As Christians, we can serve God in a variety of vocations. And we don’t need to justify that work, whatever it is, in terms of its ‘spiritual’ value or evangelistic usefulness. We simply exercise whatever our calling is with new God-glorifying motives, goals, and standards.”

“Outwardly there may be no discernible difference between a non-Christian’s work and that of a Christian. A transformational approach to culture doesn’t mean every human activity practiced by a Christian (designing computers, repairing cars, selling insurance, or driving a bus) must be obviously and externally different from the same activities practiced by non-Christians.”

“Rather, the difference is found in the motive, goal, and standard. John Frame writes, ‘The Christian seeks to change his tires to the glory of God and the non-Christian does not. But that’s a difference that couldn’t be captured in a photograph.'”

“So, while Christians are to separate from the self-glorifying motives and God-ignoring goals of the world (our spiritual separation), we’re not to separate from the peoples, places, and things in the world (a spatial separation). We’re to be morally and spiritually distinct without being culturally segregated. In the famous words of Abraham Kuyper, ‘There is not one square inch in the entire domain of our human existence over which Christ, who is Sovereign over all, does not cry, ‘Mine!’”

“For church leaders, this means that we make a huge mistake when we define a person’s ‘call’ in terms of participation inside the church—nursery work, Sunday school teacher, youth worker, music leader, and so on. We need to help our people see that their calling is bigger than how much time they put into church matters. By reducing the notion of calling to the exercise of spiritual gifts inside the church, we fail to help our people see that calling involves everything we are and everything we do—both inside and, more importantly, outside the church.”

“I once heard Os Guinness address a question about why the church in the late 20th century was not having a larger impact in our world when there were more people going to church than ever before. He said the main reason was not that Christians weren’t where they should be. There are plenty of artists, lawyers, doctors, and business owners that are Christians. Rather, the main reason is that Christians aren’t who they should be right where they are.”

“’Calling’, he said, ‘is the truth that God calls us to himself so decisively that everything we are, everything we do, and everything we have is invested with a special devotion, dynamism, and direction.’ When we reduce the notion of ‘calling’ to work inside the church, we fail to equip our people to apply their Christian faith to everything they do, everywhere they are” (Tullian Tchividjian).

Steve Cornell

About Wisdomforlife

Just another worker in God's field.
This entry was posted in 18 Year factor, Call to ministry, Calling, Contentment, Disciple-making, Evangelism, Fathers, Gospel-centered, Holistic ministry, Missions, Walking with God, Witness, Work and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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