Using the accusation of hate

In the gay marriage debate, stop playing the hate card
By Matthew J. Franck
Friday, December 17, 2010

The Washington Post
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/12/17/AR2010121702528.html

“In the debates over gay marriage, ‘hate’ is the ultimate conversation-stopper.”

“What’s going on here? Clearly a determined effort is afoot, in cultural bastions controlled by the left, to anathematize traditional views of sexual morality, particularly opposition to same-sex marriage, as the expression of “hate” that cannot be tolerated in a decent civil society. The argument over same-sex marriage must be brought to an end, and the debate considered settled. Defenders of traditional marriage must be likened to racists, as purveyors of irrational fear and loathing. Opposition to same-sex marriage must be treated just like support for now long-gone anti-miscegenation laws.”

“Marginalize, privatize, anathematize: These are the successive goals of gay-marriage advocates when it comes to their opponents.”

“‘First, ignore the arguments of traditional marriage’s defenders, that marriage has always existed in order to bring men and women together so that children will have mothers and fathers, and that same-sex marriage is not an expansion but a dismantling of the institution.”

“Second, drive the wedge between faith and reason, chasing traditional religious arguments on marriage and morality underground, as private forms of irrationality.”

“Finally, decree the victory of the new public morality – here the judges have their role in the liberal strategy – and read the opponents of the new dispensation out of polite society, as the crazed bigots of our day.”

“American democracy doesn’t need civility enforcers, nor must it become a public square with signs reading “no labels allowed.” Robust debate is necessarily passionate debate, especially on a question like marriage. But the charge of “hate” is not a contribution to argument; it’s the recourse of people who would rather not have an argument at all.”

“That is no way to conduct public business on momentous questions in a free democracy. ‘Hate’ cannot be permitted to be the conversation stopper in the same-sex marriage debate. The American people, a tolerant bunch who have acted to protect marriage in three-fifths of the states, just aren’t buying it. And they still won’t buy it even if the judges do.”

Matthew J. Franck is Director of the William E. and Carol G. Simon Center on Religion and the Constitution at the Witherspoon Institute in Princeton, N.J.

——————————————————

See also:

A Tough Season for Believers
By ROSS DOUTHAT
December 19, 2010

New York Times
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/20/opinion/20douthat.html?_r=3

About Wisdomforlife

Just another worker in God's field.
This entry was posted in 44th President, Culture, Democrats, Don't Ask; Don't Tell, Gay, Gay Marriage?, Hate speech, Homosexual lifestyle, Homosexuality, Political Correctness, Politics, Republican. Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to Using the accusation of hate

  1. Pingback: The language of manipulation « A Time to Think

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