7 links worth seeing

10 Things I Wish I Knew Before My First Full-Time Job

As the school year comes to a close, 2014 graduates enter an uncertain time. Here are 10 things I wish I knew before my first full-time job that your campus career center won’t tell you.

Singled Out in Church

I love the church. I love that I grew up in the church. Because I love the people who cared for, prayed with, loved, and taught me during this time, I grew up considering church as family. That is, until my place in the church—or in the family—became less defined.

Why We Should Say “Yes” to a Culture of Marriage

While promoting pro-growth economic policy (as the authors propose) is important, retreating from marriage is not the answer. Restoring a marriage culture is essential for the welfare of men, women, and children.

7 dangerous Apps that parents need to know about

A look into the some of the scariest Apps for your kids.

Spite Is Good. Spite Works.

Psychologists are exploring spitefulness in its customary role as a negative trait, a lapse that should be embarrassing but is often sublimated as righteousness, as when you take your own sour time pulling out of a parking space because you notice another car is waiting for it and you’ll show that vulture who’s boss here, even though you’re wasting your own time, too.

Reality check on sexual temptation

The sight of a beautiful woman has special power to hold men captive. The atmosphere changes when a good-looking lady enters a room full of men. This will always be the case and it’s not entirely wrong. God designed a natural attraction between the sexes. It’s a universal reality and arguably essential to our survival. But what is natural is easily perverted in the hearts and hands of fallen people. Attraction degenerates into lust and leads to sexual immorality. People get hurt.

Sex After Christianity

Gay marriage is not just a social revolution but a cosmological one.

 

Relationship 101 Class (audio)

For more than 20 years, I’ve been teaching a class to help singles with one of the most important decisions of life: How to choose a mate.

We’ve had about a thousand singles take this class! To get a taste of what I teach, I recorded the third session from last Sunday evening.

4 Bases for Attraction

  1. Looks
  2. Personality
  3. Common interests
  4. Shared beliefs, values and priorities

Stages of relationship

Acquaintance > Friendship > Dating > Exclusive relationship > Engaged > Married

Steve Cornell

5 links worth seeing

“… kids respond positively to praise; they enjoy hearing that they’re talented, smart and so on. But after such praise of their innate abilities, they collapse at the first experience of difficulty. Demoralized by their failure, they say they’d rather cheat than risk failing again.

Most jobs require us to interact with others, working as a team to achieve stated objectives.  How we approach this interaction provides us with an opportunity to demonstrate the Gospel actively working in and through our lives.  This interaction also provides an opportunity to invest in the lives of others in a mentoring relationship that demonstrates how biblical manhood translates to our everyday lives.

Here are eight suggestions for making the most of your not-yet married life.

“In contemporary America,” says Anthony Esolen, “condemnation of pedophilia rests on sentiment and not on moral reasoning. Nobody can simultaneously explain why pedophilia is so vile and uphold the first commandment of the sexual revolution: Fulfill thy desires.”

In my article on the Ten Most Hated Jobs, there were some surprises. There are also some surprises in the ten happiest jobs, as reported a General Social Survey by the National Organization for Research at the University of Chicago.

Worship Video

Last night, I was privileged to speak at the Navigators chapter of Millersville University. About 80 university students gather in our Student Ministry Center which is walking distance to the entire campus.

It was a great evening and 22 students signed up for my Relationship 101 class (aka. Dating, Engagement, & Marriage class). Half of those who signed up were guys! 

It will be my 21st year teaching the class on how to make the marriage decision one of your best decisions.

I determined many years ago to work hard at preventative ministry in this area. We meet for 7-8 evenings starting Sunday night, October 6th (8-9:15 PM) at 58 West Frederick Street, Millersville, PA. 17551. Please prays for this class. We already have 35 signed up!

Check out the video that they played last night at Navs to prepare for worship:

18-29 Year olds

For more than 28 years of ministry, I’ve worked with those in the life-phase of emerging adulthood (or, adultolescence).

Over the last decade, I’ve observed some significant changes in this age group that align with many of the conclusions reached by sociologist Christian Smith in his book, Souls In Transition, The Religious and Spiritual Lives of Emerging Adults, (Oxford University Press).

Smith’s work focused on Americans ages 18-29 and his observations on the way young people think about moral, political and religious opinion generally align with my experience.

I don’t pretend to be an expert in this area but after many years of ministry working with this life-phase and raising four children to adulthood, I offer 10 suggestions for ministry as a means to better serve those we care deeply about. I also welcome feedback (correction, expansion, explanation, etc…).

Steve Cornell

Prescription for great relationships

 

This one is for married couples and for singles who are looking for true love.

I often tell people that it takes work for marriage to work. It’s one thing to be in love and another to love someone for life.

We tend to want everything to be easier than it often is and end up missing out on the deeper blessings by giving up too early when we face difficulties. I don’t say this to encourage anyone to stay in an abusive relationship. Or to settle for one that is wrongly matched up.

Once married, however, a couple must intentionally resist complacency if they desire to thrive in their relationship. Doing this requires more than will power. There must also be a shared standard to reach toward.

I believe that one of the best standards is  found in I Corinthians 13:4-8. Here we learn how love behaves in relationships. Here we find God’s prescription for great relationships.

Here is love that protects relationships from destructive conflict. This love opposes bitter rivilary. While playful rivalry is not bad and can be fun, troubled relationships are almost always plagued with some form of ugly and divisive rivalry.

Revisit true love:

  1. Love is patient: It is long-suffering. It restrains anger when provoked. Patience is more than passive waiting. It’s active restraint that rests in God.
  2. Love is kind: It reaches out in good will with acts of care for others. Love patiently forebears and in kindness — actively pursues. Loving people are distinguished by their kindness.
  3. Love does not envy: It does not resent the blessings of others. Envious people engage in rivalry. The envier gloats over the harm or misfortune of the one envied. She delights in evil.
  4. Love does not boast: Love corrects the desire to call attention to self. A loving person is not a windbag or braggart. He does not parade himself. Love is willing to work anonymously. It needs no stage, applause or recognition.
  5. Love is not proud: not puffed up; not arrogant; not full of oneself. A loving person does not think more highly of himself than sober judgment dictates (Romans 12:3).
  6. Love is does not dishonor others: It is not rude. It is respectful of others.
  7. Love is not self-seeking: It does not insist on its own way. It is not self-absorbed.
  8. Love is not easily angered: It is not easily agitated nor easily provoked. Loving people are not hot-tempered, short-fused people.
  9. Love keeps no record of wrongs: Love seeks forgiveness and reconciliation. When hurt badly, this part of love is hard to practice. 
  10. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth: This rules out gossip, slander, and delight in the downfall of others.

The grand finale: Love always protects, trusts, hopes, perseveres.

Using a staccato of four verbs with repeated emphasis on how love brings everything under its influence, we learn that, “there is nothing love cannot face” (NEB).

“Love never gives up, never loses faith, is always hopeful, and endures through every circumstance” (NLT). Love is tenacious and faithful. Love is brave and noble; it never fails.

Love is “the most excellent way” (I Corinthians 12:31). “These three remain: Faith, hope and love. But the greatest of these is love” (I Corinthians 13:13). “Over all virtues, put on love, which binds them all together in perfect unity” (Colossians 3:14).

God’s love was put on display when he loved unworthy people like you and me. For “when we were still sinners, Christ died for us” (Romans 5:8).

Jesus gave us a great example of love by coming into our world and humbling himself for our benefit. The Creator became a creature; the King became a servant; the Shepherd became a lamb;  the High Priest became the sacrifice, the sinless one was made sin for us that we might be acceptable before God in Him! (see: II Corinthians 5:17-21; Philippians 2:3-10).

Steve Cornell

Hurt by a broken relationship

If you’ve been hurt by a past relationship, I encourage you to learn from your experience.

    • Take inventory with the help of a wise friend or counselor who can offer godly perspective.
    • Make changes in your life that will help you become wiser in how you approach relationships.
    • Remind yourself that bitterness and standing aloof from intimate relationships locks you in a prison of fear and loneliness.
    • Acknowledge that a choice to love is essential but vulnerable. 
    • Explore some of the deeper issues in your relationship with God as the providential Ruler of life.
    • Recommit to Psalm 62:1-2 “I find my rest in God alone. He is the One who saves me. He alone is my rock. He is the One who saves me. He is like a fort to me. I will always be secure.”
    • Finally, think more deeply about love.

Cultural understandings of love are too often shallow and self-absorbed. Love is more than emotion and infatuation. Many people could minimize some of the hurt by abandoning cultural distortions of love.

Returning dignity and even toughness to love is essential if we hope to stop the tide of broken relationships in our culture.

Love is a value and commitment word

To love someone is to value them. “I love you” could be rephrased, “I deeply value you.” Love is also a term of devotion or commitment. “I love you” in this case could be rephrased, “I am devoted to you.” To say, “I don’t love you anymore” should be understood as, “I choose not to value you or remain devoted to you.” Too often we use the language of emotion in saying, “I just don’t feel love for him or her anymore.” In this case, a person makes himself a victim of love incapable of controlling the outcome. This is profoundly misguided.

Love focuses on others and is not a term for selfish people to use. Love is not valuing people for what they do for you. This is the opposite of love. Love seeks what is best for the one loved — even if it requires doing or saying what the loved one doesn’t want to receive. This is essential to understand and apply. To love someone is also to seek what is best for that person as God defines best. Sometimes this will mean confronting a loved one rather than being an enabler to selfish attitudes and actions.

If love is mature, of course, it will overlook many little offenses and be full of grace and forgiveness (I Peter 4:8). But Love cannot thrive where dishonesty and deceit exist. It’s simply not loving to allow a loved one to remain on a path of self-absorption and self-destruction. When love fulfills this tougher role, it’s often be misconstrued as being unloving. Expect this response when dealing with manipulative and selfish people but be strong enough to see through it for what it is.

Loving others must always be based on God’s definition of what is best.

Love from God’s perspective is self-giving to the point of getting hurt. God loved unloving people like us and His choice to love hurt Him. Scripture says that, “God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us” (Romans 5:8). God’s love for us is the example to follow and the basis for our security when we choose to risk loving others (see: Romans 8:38-39).

It’s one thing to be in love; it’s another to love someone for a lifetime. The most secure way to love is to modeled our love after God’s love. When we know that we are deeply secure in the love God has for us, we won’t tend as much to seek from another human being the love that only God can give to us.

“Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall trouble or hardship or persecution or famine or nakedness or danger or sword? …. No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us. For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord” (Romans 8:35-39).

Before entering a love relationship with another person, please be sure to first deeply experience what was written by the apostle John, “And so we know and rely on the love God has for us. God is love” (I John 4:16).

My prayer for you:

That you will: “See what great love the Father has lavished on us, that we should be called children of God! And that is what we are!” (I John 3:1).

“I pray that out of his glorious riches he may strengthen you with power through his Spirit in your inner being, so that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith. And I pray that you, being rooted and established in love, may have power, together with all the Lord’s holy people, to grasp how wide and long and high and deep is the love of Christ, and to know this love that surpasses knowledge —that you may be filled to the measure of all the fullness of God. Now to him who is able to do immeasurably more than all we ask or imagine, according to his power that is at work within us, to him be glory in the church and in Christ Jesus throughout all generations, for ever and ever! Amen” (Ephesians 3:16-20).

Steve Cornell

See also: How to Move from Forgiveness to Reconciliation

Can you love without getting hurt?

A Scottish rock band from the 70’s produced a hit single titled, “Love hurts.” 

“Love hurts, love scars, Love wounds, and marks, Any heart, not tough, Or strong, enough To take a lot of pain, Take a lot of pain…ooh ooh love hurts.”

Is it true? Have you ever been hurt by love? I’ve met people so badly hurt by love that they’re unwilling to risk loving again. They desire love and being loved but fear the risk of loving. They live with a wall around them to protect them from being hurt by love.

They live with a kind of catch 22

Loneliness is tough, but love is risky. Life without love feels empty at times, but it’s less complicated. Being single is challenging, but choosing to love means vulnerability and the loss of love hurts.

Ask a widow or widower if loss of a lover hurts. Ask parents how much pain they feel when their child strays into destructive behavior. Think of the pain caused by divorce. Yes, love hurts. Labels like widow, widower and divorcee convey a sense of hurt and pain.

A lesson learned at a conference



A number of years ago, I was the guest speaker at a large conference for singles. My theme focused on the decision of marriage. More than three hundred singles attended the conference and, unknown to me, half of them were single again through divorce. It quickly became apparent that many in the audience had been significantly hurt in previous relationships. They showed it on their faces and in their demeanor.

These singles faced conflicting desires. They wanted to be in a marriage relationship but were strongly resolved not to get hurt again. As a result, they built protective walls around themselves that hindered their ability to step toward relationships that might lead to marriage.

Midway into our conference, I put aside my notes and addressed the issue directly. You could have heard a pin drop when I did this. Many of them knew they faced self-constructed obstacles and they received my words as a kind of welcomed relief.

I reminded the singles that to love is to be vulnerable. The walls they built for protection also imprisoned them. The risk of reliving their pain was so great that they (almost unknowingly) hid behind protective mechanisms that hindered their ability to cultivate deep relationships. They needed to realize that those unwilling risk loving often end up in undesired lives of isolation and loneliness.

When couples or communities take a low-risk approach to love, relationships become shallow and superficial.

I encouraged the singles to remember that when we choose to live full and flourishing lives we will get hurt. Others risked being hurt when they loved us and most of us would admit that we have (in some ways) hurt those who have loved us.

Loving another person is risky



In a fallen world, people get hurt. Some who choose to love are misunderstood or taken for granted. Others are betrayed or abandoned. Some suffer by watching a loved one suffer. Others suffer loss of a loved one. Love will always involve potential for hurt. But through our hurts we can become stronger and wiser– if we respond positively. The key for many of these singles was to learn from their experiences instead of being enslaved by them.

Of course, we must be wise enough not to walk blindly into an obvious set up for pain. This is why I was teaching about how to make the decision of marriage one of their best decisions.

If you’ve been hurt by a relationship due to carelessness on your own part, learn from it. Take inventory by sitting down with a wise counselor who can help you see the forest through the trees. Make changes that will help you become wiser in how you approach relationships. Explore deeper issues in your relationship with God as the providential ruler of your life.

If you choose bitterness and remain distant from close relationships, you’ll lock yourself in a prison of fear and loneliness.

Think more deeply about love



Cultural understandings of love are shallow and self-absorbed. They’re often reduced to emotion and infatuation. I am convinced that we could minimize some of the hurt from love if we abandoned cultural distortions of it. Returning dignity and even toughness to love is essential if we hope to stop the tide of broken relationships in our culture.

Love is a value word

To love someone is to value them. “I love you” could be exchanged with “I deeply value you.” Love is also a term of devotion or commitment. “I love you” in this case could be phrased, “I am devoted to you.” To say, “I don’t love you anymore” should be understood as, “I choose not to value you or remain devoted to you.”

Warning to selfish people and enablers



Love focuses on others and is not a term for selfish people. Some people only value others for what they do for them. This is the opposite of love. True love seeks what is best for the one loved — even if it requires doing or saying what the loved one doesn’t want to receive. Sometimes this will mean confronting a loved one rather than enabling destructive attitudes and actions.

When love fulfills this role, it will often be misconstrued as unloving. Expect this response when dealing with manipulative and selfish users. Loving others must always be based on God’s definition of what is best.

If love is mature, of course, it will overlook many minor offenses and be full of grace and forgiveness. But Love cannot thrive where dishonesty and deception exist.

Love from God’s perspective is self-giving to the point of suffering. God loved unloving people like us and it hurt him. Scripture says that “God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us” (Romans 5:8). God’s love for us is both our example to follow and the firm foundation for our security when we risk loving others (see: Romans 8:38-39).

Steve Cornell

Is there a catch-22 in love?

Many singles feel like they’re in a kind of catch 22.

They are likely surrounded by a culture of marriage and family in a way that can make them feel as if life is “on hold” until they get married.

Their desire for intimate companionship and periodic feelings of loneliness can be tough. Yet many know from experience that love is risky. 

Although life without marriage might feel a empty at times, it’s less complicated. Being single is challenging, but love involves vulnerability. And many know how bad it hurts to break up with someone they love.

Several years ago, I learned a lesson about how many people have been hurt by loss of love. I was the guest speaker at a large single’s conference. My theme was focused on the decision of marriage. More than three hundred singles attended the conference and, unknown to me, half of them were “single again” through divorce. It quickly became apparent that many had been badly hurt in previous relationships. They showed it on their faces and in protective demeanors.

Many of these singles faced conflicting desires. They clearly want a marriage relationship but were deeply resolved not to be hurt again. The protective walls they erected to avoid future pain also hindered their ability to step toward relationships that might lead to marriage.

Midway into the conference, I put aside my notes and addressed the issue directly. You could have heard a pin drop as I explained what I sensed from them. Interestingly, they received my words as a kind of welcomed relief even though I didn’t necessarily inform them of anything they didn’t already know. Simply hearing someone articulate they’re feelings meant a lot to them. 

I reminded the singles that the walls they had built for protection could also imprison them. The risk of more pain felt so great that they (almost unknowingly) hid behind protective mechanisms that kept them from cultivating deep relationships. To love is to become vulnerable. They needed to realize that those unwilling risk loving often end up in undesired lives of isolation and loneliness.

When couples or communities take a low-risk approach to love, relationships become shallow and superficial.

I encouraged the singles to accept the fact that living full and flourishing lives in this world will involve being hurt. Others had to risk being hurt when they loved us and most of us would admit that we have (at least in some ways) hurt those who loved us.

Loving another person is risky because we live in a fallen world. Some who choose to love are taken for granted; others are betrayed or abandoned. Some suffer by watching a loved one suffer; others suffer the loss of a loved one. Love will always involve hurt, but through hurts we can become stronger and wiser – if we respond with a positive and eternal perspective. 

The key for many of these singles is to allow some time for processing and learning from their hurts. This will help protect them from walking blindly into an obvious set up for more pain. 

My advice is to learn from your experience if you’ve been hurt by a past relationship.

    • Take inventory with the help of a wise counselor who can offer godly perspective.
    • Make changes in your life that will help you become wiser in how you approach relationships.
    • Remind yourself that those who choose bitterness and stand aloof from intimate relationships lock themselves in a prison of fear and loneliness.
    • Explore some of the deeper issues in your relationship with God as the providential Ruler of life.

Finally, we all need to think more deeply about love. Cultural understandings of love are too often shallow and self-absorbed. Love is more than emotion and infatuation.

Many people could minimize some of the hurt from love by abandoning cultural distortions of it. Returning dignity and even toughness to love is essential if we hope to stop the tide of broken relationships in our culture.

Love is a value word

To love someone is to value them. Love is also a term of devotion or commitment. To say, “I don’t love you anymore” should be understood as, “I choose not to value you or remain devoted to you.”

Love focuses on others

Love is not a term for selfish people to use. It’s not loving to only value people for what they do for you. This is the opposite of love. Love seeks what is best for the one loved even if it requires doing or saying what the loved one doesn’t want to receive. This is essential to understand and apply. To love someone is also to seek what is best for that person as God defines best. Sometimes this will mean confronting a loved one rather than being an enabler to destructive attitudes and actions.

If love is mature, of course, it will overlook many little offenses and be full of grace and forgiveness (I Peter 4:8). But Love cannot thrive where dishonesty and deceit exist. It’s simply not a loving action to allow a loved one to remain on a path of self-destruction. When love fulfills this tougher role, it’s often be misconstrued as being unloving. Expect this response when dealing with manipulative and selfish people.

Loving others must always be based on God’s definition of what is best.

Love from God’s perspective is self-giving.

God loved unloving people like us and His choice to love hurt Him. Scripture says that, “God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us” (Romans 5:8). God’s love for us is the example to follow and the basis for our security when we choose to risk loving others (see: Romans 8:38-39).

I remind singles that it’s one thing to be in love; another to love someone for a life time. The most secure way to love is to model our love after God’s love. When we know that we are deeply secure in the love God has for us, we won’t tend as much to seek from another human being the love that only God can give to us.

“Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall trouble or hardship or persecution or famine or nakedness or danger or sword? …. No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us. For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord” (Romans 8:35-39).

Before entering a love relationship with another person, please be sure to first deeply experience what was written by the apostle John, “And so we know and rely on the love God has for us. God is love” (I John 4:16).

My prayer is for you to…

“See what great love the Father has lavished on us, that we should be called children of God! And that is what we are!” (I John 3:1). 

“I pray that out of his glorious riches he may strengthen you with power through his Spirit in your inner being, so that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith. And I pray that you, being rooted and established in love, may have power, together with all the Lord’s holy people, to grasp how wide and long and high and deep is the love of Christ, and to know this love that surpasses knowledge —that you may be filled to the measure of all the fullness of God. Now to him who is able to do immeasurably more than all we ask or imagine, according to his power that is at work within us, to him be glory in the church and in Christ Jesus throughout all generations, for ever and ever! Amen” (Ephesians 3:16-20).

Steve Cornell

See also:

Finding love that lasts a lifetime  
Answering the first question about marriage  
One requirement for the marriage decision

Campus Ministry Resources

For more than 27 years, my pastoral ministry has been in a University town. I love interaction with students and faculty! But those who follow Christ in a university context face some significant challenges. This is why I am always looking for good resources to help them. Check out these  articles from the Christ on Campus Initiative:

____________________________________________

Human Flourishing

by Danielle Sallade

A flourishing life will be a life lived in right relationship with God, with one’s environment, with neighbors, and with self. “A flourishing life is neither merely an ‘experientially satisfying life,’ as many contemporary Westerners think, nor is it simply a life ‘well-lived,’ as a majority of ancient Western philosophers have claimed.” It is a life that both goes well and is lived well.

Sin:
 Not the Way It’s Supposed to Be

by Cornelius Plantinga Jr.

In the 1991 film Grand Canyon, an immigration attorney breaks out of a traffic jam and tries to drive around it. He doesn’t know where he’s going and he’s alarmed to note that each street seems darker and more deserted than the last. Then, a nightmare. His fancy sports car stalls. He manages to call for a tow truck, but before it arrives, five local toughs surround his car and threaten him. Just in time, the tow truck shows up and its driver—an earnest, genial man—begins to hook up to the sports car.

Five Arguments for God

by William Lane Craig

It’s perhaps something of a surprise that almost none of the so-called New Atheists has anything to say about arguments for God’s existence. Instead, they do tend to focus on the social effects of religion and question whether religious belief is good for society. One might justifiably doubt that the social impact of an idea for good or ill is an adequate measure of its truth, especially when there are reasons being offered to think that the idea in question really is true.

Christianity and Sexuality

by Christopher Ash

Why is sex so fascinating? (Why did you choose to read this essay rather than the others?) That’s one question. But why pay any attention to what Christians believe about sex? That’s quite another. And yet the very fascination of sex is a pointer to a religious dimension. Every time a lover “worships” his beloved, every time a woman says it will be “hell” to live without her man, whenever someone says to a lover, “take me to heaven,” or describes a woman as a “goddess,” they use religious language.

I Believe in Nature: An Exploration of Naturalism and the Biblical Worldview

by Kirsten Birkett

One of the most common beliefs currently expounded in public literature is naturalism. Naturalism is a belief that only natural laws and forces work in the world. The supernatural (anything beyond the natural world, whether spiritual, magical or otherwise) does not exist. The physical universe is all that exists. Moreover, the only way to explain anything within the universe is in terms of entirely natural events and forces within the universe.

One Lord and Savior for All? Jesus Christ and Religious Diversity

by Harold A. Netland

Nathan the Wise, the last play written by the eighteenth-century philosopher and dramatist Gotthold Ephraim Lessing, contains a fascinating reworking of the classic parable of the three rings. The parable first appears in the fourteenth century in Boccaccio’s Decameron, but Lessing modifies it slightly so that it expresses nicely the Enlightenment call for religious toleration and condemnation of religious dogmatism. If it were updated slightly, it could be taken as an expression of early twenty-first century views as well.

Do Christians Have a Worldview?

by Graham Cole

Frames of reference are keys to understanding, to reading the world of our experience. Eric Fromm found that out as a young man before he became a prominent therapist and humanist thinker. He contemplated the carnage of the First World War and wondered, “How come such violence? How could cultured peoples slaughter each other in the millions?” That thought led him to study Karl Marx and the outer world of human history. He wanted to make some kind of sense of the world of his experience. 

Jesus of Nazareth: How Historians Can Know Him and Why It Matters

by Craig L. Blomberg

Jesus of Nazareth has been the most influential person to walk this earth in human history. To this day, more than two billion people worldwide claim to be his followers, more than the number of adherents to any other religion or worldview. Christianity is responsible for a disproportionately large number of the humanitarian advances in the history of civilization—in education, medicine, law, the fine arts, working for human rights, and even in the natural sciences…

A Christian Perspective on Islam

by Chawkat Moucarry 

Islam claims that Judaism, Christianity, and Islam itself are three God-given religions. All prophets (including Moses, Jesus, and Muhammad) preached essentially the same message: God is one, and everyone must obey and worship him because on the day of judgment people will be sent to paradise or to hell according to whether or not they believed in their Creator and complied with his laws.

Check this out too: Kategoria